ship.energy

The ship.energy podcast: Tuomas Riski, CEO, Norsepower

With such focus on future fuels, we sometimes need to remind ourselves of the considerable opportunity that rests with alternative propulsion systems and fuel efficient technologies in driving the shipping industry to its zero emissions future. Joining us to discuss this interesting avenue of the decarbonisation challenge is Tuomas Riski, CEO of Helsinki-based rotor sail manufacturer, Norsepower. Having established Norsepower in 2012 and steered the organisation through a string of successful installations, Tuomas guides us through the important role of technologies in furthering the zero-carbon agenda, as well as in maintaining cost efficiency for maritime operations today.

Tuomas Riski

Mr Tuomas Riski, CEO, Norsepower M.Sc. (Econ. & Tech.) is the CEO of Norsepower Oy Ltd, which is a Finnish clean tech and engineering company pioneering modern auxiliary wind propulsion for the global maritime industry.

Norsepower’s Rotor Sail Solution is a proven, low-maintenance, easy to use, and reliable fuel saving technology, supporting the decarbonisation of the shipping industry.

Norsepower’s Rotor Sails are currently used on board a variety of vessels. The latest installation involved installing two 35m high Rotor Sails on a Ro-Ro, the SC Connector. This installation was the first time the Rotor Sail design has been adapted to provide a tilting function to almost horizon when on height restricted routes.


The ship.energy podcast has its finger on the pulse of the marine energy transition. In the coming weeks and months it will feature the views and perspectives of the key stakeholders and opinion-formers who are engaged in shaping shipping’s evolution to becoming a low – and ultimately zero – GHG emissions industry.

Expect some forthright, always informative – and sometimes controversial – opinions from the leaders of the global shipping, marine fuels and technology sectors

Join the journey and listen to the growing discussion about shipping’s mission to be a ‘clean’ industry.

Mark Williams

Cheryl Marshall

Cheryl Marshall